A new exhibition of contemporary photography arrives in Valletta

A new collection of contemporary photography has landed in Valletta, showcasing a metaphysical approach to photography – from the apparent clarity of day to the evanescent depths of nighttime shadows.

The exhibition brings together photographs by Nigel Baldacchino, Bénédicte Blondeau, Bernard Plossu and Awoiska Van der Molen and is on view until August 13 at the Valletta Contemporary.

Anne Immelé, curator, is co-founder of the Biennale de la photographie de Mulhouse, France.

Immelé practices his own photography and has exhibited his work numerous times while publishing his work in famous photo books. Today, she lives and works in the Rhine region and teaches MFA at HEAR, Haute école des arts du Rhin. (French School of Art and Music).

The exhibition invites the viewer to move through contrasting environments that provoke a multiplicity of perceptions.

Like images perceived in the blink of an eye, the exhibition articulates visions of a reality that is sometimes close, sometimes distant.

From the vast radiant deserts of Bernard Plossu to the arid, shadow-lit caves of Bénédicte Blondeau, from the urban parks of Nigel Baldacchino at dawn to the worry-free urban architecture of Awoiska van der Molen at dusk, the photographs transport the viewer into imaginary spaces, oscillating between the first signs of life at dawn until dusk and disappearance.

A singular representation of natural or artificial objects and structures, these images recall the paradoxical nature of photography, characterized by its ability to record and represent the visible, as well as its ability to disrupt it.

The presentation of photographic “evidence” conveys doubt and introspection, looking outward, as a way of looking inward.

Both intimate and distant, these images depict a close and personal gaze that presents itself less as something to be grasped than to witness. The spirit of the work, its mute universe, lies just outside the frame, reinforcing the paradox of photography as evocation rather than portrait.

The exhibition itself does not present the subjects and spaces photographed in any hierarchy or narrative. Instead, the show is intended as an extended meditation, an active and poetic contemplation on the medium transcending its defining lens.

The exhibition benefits from the Project Support Fund of the Arts Council Malta

Additional support from: NOI Studio, Valletta Vintage, French Embassy in Malta, iLAB Photo, Saint Paul Valletta and People and Skin

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